There are multiple interactions reported between these two agents.

Interaction Details

Methadone is classified as belonging to the following category: Cns Depressants

Theoretically, cannabidiol might have additive effects if used with other CNS depressants.
Preliminary clinical research, case reports, and animal studies suggest that high dose cannabidiol has sedative and hypnotic effects. Theoretically, concomitant use of cannabidiol with drugs with sedative and anesthetic properties may cause additive therapeutic and adverse effects.

Interaction Rating

Moderate

Likelihood of Occurrence

Possible

Interaction has been documented in animal or in lab research, or the interaction has been documented in humans but is limited to case reports or conflicting clinical research exists

References

  • Carlini EA, Cunha JM. Hypnotic and antiepileptic effects of cannabidiol. J Clin Pharmacol 1981;21(8-9 Suppl):417S-27S.
  • Monti JM. Hypnoticlike effects of cannabidiol in the rat. Psychopharmacology (Berl) 1977;55(3):263-5.
  • Pickens JT. Sedative activity of cannabis in relation to its delta'-trans-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol content. Br J Pharmacol 1981;72(4):649-56.
  • Perez-Vilar S, Karami S, Long K, Leishear K. Cannabidiol exposures in the United States, National Poison Data System, July 2014-June 2021. Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2022.

Interaction Details

Methadone is classified as belonging to the following category: Cytochrome P450 2D6 (Cyp2D6) Substrates

Theoretically, cannabidiol might increase levels of drugs metabolized by CYP2D6.
In vitro research shows that cannabidiol inhibits CYP2D6. Theoretically, concomitant use of cannabidiol with CYP2D6 substrates might increase the risk for adverse effects from these substrates. However, a clinical crossover trial in healthy adults shows that cannabidiol does not inhibit dextromethorphan, a substrate of CYP2D6.

Interaction Rating

Moderate

Likelihood of Occurrence

Possible

Interaction has been documented in animal or in lab research, or the interaction has been documented in humans but is limited to case reports or conflicting clinical research exists

References

  • Yamaori S, Okamoto Y, Yamamoto I, Watanabe K. Cannabidiol, a major phytocannabinoid, as a potent atypical inhibitor for CYP2D6. Drug Metab Dispos 2011;39(11):2049-56.
  • Nasrin S, Watson CJW, Perez-Paramo YX, Lazarus P. Cannabinoid Metabolites as Inhibitors of Major Hepatic CYP450 Enzymes, with Implications for Cannabis-Drug Interactions. Drug Metab Dispos 2021;49(12):1070-1080.
  • Bansal S, Zamarripa CA, Spindle TR, et al. Evaluation of Cytochrome P450-Mediated Cannabinoid-Drug Interactions in Healthy Adult Participants. Clin Pharmacol Ther 2023.

Interaction Details

Methadone is classified as belonging to the following category: Cytochrome P450 3A4 (Cyp3A4) Substrates

Cannabidiol may increase levels of drugs that are metabolized by CYP3A4.
In vitro and animal research shows that cannabidiol inhibits CYP3A4. In human studies and case reports, cannabidiol has been associated with an increase in plasma levels of the CYP3A4 substrates zonisamide, tacrolimus, everolimus, citalopram, midazolam, and methadone.

Interaction Rating

Moderate

Likelihood of Occurrence

Probable

Interaction has not been documented in well-controlled studies, however, the interaction has been demonstrated in some small human studies or in controlled animal studies in conjunction with multiple case reports.

References

  • Yamaori S, Ebisawa J, Okushima Y, et al. Potent inhibition of human cytochrome P450 3A isoforms by cannabidiol: role of phenolic hydroxyl groups in the resorcinol moiety. Life Sci 2011;88(15-16):730-6.
  • Harvey DJ. Absorption, distribution, and biotransformation of the cannabinoids. Marijuana and Medicine. 1999;91-103.
  • Bornheim LM, Everhart ET, Li J, Correia MA. Characterization of cannabidiol-mediated cytochrome P450 inactivation. Biochem Pharmacol 1993;45(6):1323-31.
  • Gaston TE, Bebin EM, Cutter GR, Liu Y, Szaflarski JP; UAB CBD Program. Interactions between cannabidiol and commonly used antiepileptic drugs. Epilepsia. 2017 Sep;58(9):1586-92.
  • Leino AD, Emoto C, Fukuda T, Privitera M, Vinks AA, Alloway RR. Evidence of a clinically significant drug-drug interaction between cannabidiol and tacrolimus. Am J Transplant. 2019;19(10):2944-2948.
  • Wiemer-Kruel A, Stiller B, Bast T. Cannabidiol Interacts Significantly with Everolimus-Report of a Patient with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex. Neuropediatrics. 2019.
  • Madden K, Tanco K, Bruera E. Clinically Significant Drug-Drug Interaction Between Methadone and Cannabidiol. Pediatrics. 2020;e20193256.
  • Anderson LL, Doohan PT, Oldfield L, et al. Citalopram and Cannabidiol: In Vitro and In Vivo Evidence of Pharmacokinetic Interactions Relevant to the Treatment of Anxiety Disorders in Young People. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2021.
  • Nasrin S, Watson CJW, Perez-Paramo YX, Lazarus P. Cannabinoid Metabolites as Inhibitors of Major Hepatic CYP450 Enzymes, with Implications for Cannabis-Drug Interactions. Drug Metab Dispos 2021;49(12):1070-1080.
  • Treyer A, Reinhardt JK, Eigenmann DE, Oufir M, Hamburger M. Phytochemical comparison of medicinal cannabis extracts and study of their CYP-mediated interactions with coumarinic oral anticoagulants. Med Cannabis Cannabinoids. 2023;6(1):21-31.
  • Bansal S, Zamarripa CA, Spindle TR, et al. Evaluation of Cytochrome P450-Mediated Cannabinoid-Drug Interactions in Healthy Adult Participants. Clin Pharmacol Ther 2023.

Interaction Details

Methadone is classified as belonging to the following category: Methadone (Dolophine)

Cannabidiol might increase levels of methadone, but the evidence is limited to a single case report.
In a case report, a 13-year-old female with chronic cancer pain who was previously stabilized on methadone 7.5 mg twice daily presented to the emergency room with opioid-related side effects. She had begun experiencing increased sleepiness and fatigue after being given cannabidiol oil 1.5 grams orally in six divided doses daily by her parents. Her serum levels of methadone had risen to 271 ng/mL but decreased to 124 ng/mL after discontinuation of cannabidiol. This coincided with resolution of excessive sleepiness and fatigue. Theoretically, cannabidiol increases levels of methadone by inhibiting cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and CYP2C19 enzymes, which metabolize methadone.

Interaction Rating

Moderate

Likelihood of Occurrence

Probable

Interaction has not been documented in well-controlled studies, however, the interaction has been demonstrated in some small human studies or in controlled animal studies in conjunction with multiple case reports.

References

  • Epidiolex (cannabidiol) prescribing information. Greenwich Biosciences, Inc., Carlsbad, CA, 2019. Available at: https://www.epidiolex.com/sites/default/files/EPIDIOLEX_Full_Prescribing_Information.pdf (accessed 5/9/2019)
  • Madden K, Tanco K, Bruera E. Clinically Significant Drug-Drug Interaction Between Methadone and Cannabidiol. Pediatrics. 2020;e20193256.

Methadone Overview

  • Methadone is used to relieve severe pain in people who are expected to need pain medication around the clock for a long time and who cannot be treated with other medications. It also is used to prevent withdrawal symptoms in patients who were addicted to opiate drugs and are enrolled in treatment programs in order to stop taking or continue not taking the drugs. Methadone is in a class of medications called opiate (narcotic) analgesics. Methadone works to treat pain by changing the way the brain and nervous system respond to pain. It works to treat people who were addicted to opiate drugs by producing similar effects and preventing withdrawal symptoms in people who have stopped using these drugs.

See More Information Regarding Methadone

Cannabidiol (cbd) - More Interactions

Cannabidiol (cbd) interacts with 1018 drugs

Interaction Rating Key

These severity listings are for informational use only. Never start, stop or otherwise change your therapy before speaking with your provider.

Major The combined use of these agents is strongly discouraged as serious side effects or other negative outcomes could occur.
Moderate Use cautiously under the care of a healthcare professional or avoid this combination. A significant interaction or negative outcome could occur.
Minor Be aware that there is a chance of an interaction. Watch for warning signs of a potential interaction.
Unknown No interactions have been reported or no interaction data is currently available.

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Parts of this content are provided by the Therapeutic Research Center, LLC.

DISCLAIMER: Currently this does not check for drug-drug interactions. This is not an all-inclusive comprehensive list of potential interactions and is for informational purposes only. Not all interactions are known or well-reported in the scientific literature, and new interactions are continually being reported. Input is needed from a qualified healthcare provider including a pharmacist before starting any therapy. Application of clinical judgment is necessary.

© 2021 Therapeutic Research Center, LLC

Drug descriptions are provided by MedlinePlus.

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